Metal Guide

Gold 9ct, 14ct, 18ct and 22ct

Gold is one of the most popular metals used in jewellery making because of its lasting beauty and opulent colour. In its purest form, gold is much too soft to be made into jewellery; therefore other metals are added to create an alloy. It’s these other metals which make gold stronger and less malleable - this is where the carat or 'ct' comes in – the less gold added the lower the carat and the fewer alloys added the higher the carat. Which means 9ct gold is only 37.5% pure gold + 62.5% other metals, and 22ct gold is 91.6% pure gold + 8.4% other metals.

Rose gold

The romantic colour of rose gold is achieved by mixing copper with yellow gold to form a strong alloy. The variety of different shades available from rosy pink to a near red tone is due to the higher or lesser amount of copper.

White gold

White gold is created by mixing yellow gold with other white metals to create and alloy which strengthens the band. This is then always plated in another white metal called Rhodium giving it a high shine and polished finished. Over time, you may notice a slight discolouring will occur to your white gold jewellery, however this is completely normal, white gold does need to be taken in to be re-plated in Rhodium.


Platinum is another white metal; however it is more expensive than other precious metals because of its rarity. Platinum benefits from an icy white colouring which will not fade or tarnish over time, as well as being remarkably hard wearing.


New to the jewellery market, palladium was first recognised as a precious metal back in 2009. It has the same properties as its sister metal palladium, however it is less dense. Plus a great benefit with palladium is that it doesn’t need rhodium plating.


Great for fashion and costume jewellery, this metal can be easily plated in rose gold or yellow gold to create an array of designs.